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The ACE in Action @ Boomaroo - Hosting / ISP Blog

 

Ransomware targeting Australians - “Locky” in an Australia Post email scam

The ACE  10 March 2016 06:06:11 PM
The CYBER-CRIMINALS have upped their game with a highly advanced new ransomware targeting Australians.

Security experts have discovered a virus called “Locky” in an Australia Post email scam, the virus which users receive in an email with a seemingly legitimate attachment.

On top of this, the virus scans users’ basic personal information from their social media profiles, which is used in the copy to convince the recipient they’re an official source.

Once the virus has been downloaded and opened, the malware runs a JavaScript code that freezes computer files and forces the user to cough up hundreds of dollars to unlock them.

The scam was discovered by an anti-virus company called MailGuard, which said hackers were using “highly advanced” technology to dupe tens of thousands of victims by scanning their social media profiles.

Skimming through an email like this, you can see how someone might assume it was legitimate:

This email looks pretty legit.

This email looks pretty legit.Source:Supplied

According to Avast, Locky uses all “top class” features, such as a domain generation algorithm, custom encrypted communication, TOR/BitCoin payment, strong RSA-2048+AES-128 file encryption and can encrypt over 160 different file types, including virtual disks, source codes and databases.

Disturbingly, they even discovered that some of the malicious files downloaded contained file path strings that included PC user names.
Security expert Paul Ducklin warned that the ransomware can also spread over associated local networks.

“It scrambles any files in any directory on any mounted drive that it can access, including removable drives that are plugged in at the time, or network shares that are accessible, including servers and other people’s computers, whether they are running Windows, OS X or Linux,” Ducklin said on Sophos’ Naked Security blog.

“If you are logged in as a domain administrator and you get hit by ransomware, you could do very widespread damage indeed.”

HOW TO AVOID BEING SCAMMED

• First and foremost, do not open suspicious files (eg. .doc, .xls, and .zip files).

• If you have any suspicions about an email you’ve received from a company, source their number independently and call them directly. Do not rely on contact numbers provided in the email.

• Purchase a hard drive and frequently back up all your files. If your computer does get infected, you can restore factory settings and replace all your important files.

• Disable Microsoft Office macros by default.

• Don’t stay logged in as an administrator any longer than necessary, and avoid browsing or opening documents while you have admin rights.

Site Sponsor - Domain Mirroring from Boomaroo.NET

The ACE  12 August 2015 07:24:46 PM
Domain mirroring

This article is about how to mirror one or more domains to another.

If you have several variations of your domain name (such as Boomaroo.com, Boomaroo.com.au and Boomaroo.info), you can choose one as your main domain name and mirror the others to it.

We call the main domain name the parent domain name and the others the child domain names. If someone opens one of your child domain names in their web browser, they’ll see the website under your parent domain name. Your child domain name is still preserved in their browser. For example, if you use mydomain.com.au as the parent domain name and mydomain.com as the child domain name, people will see the website under mydomain.com.auwhen they open mydomain.com in their browsers, and the mydomain.com is still displayed in their browsers.

The email accounts at the child domain names can be mirrored as well. If someone sends emails to an address at the child domain name, the emails will be forwarded to the equivalent email address at the parent domain name. For example, if an email is sent to info@Boomaroo.com, it will be forwarded to info@Boomaroo.com.au automatically.

To set up the domain mirroring, please contact Liz

Chinese monkeys who cant even tell what web (HTTP) servers we are using

The ACE  6 February 2015 07:12:21 AM
More of the same old same old boring attempts to vector into our web (HTTP) servers.

These Chinese Monkeys cant even tell what our HTTP server is, there are very simply free programs that will tell you this, but, no they are trying different file extensions.

This is actually very embarrassing for these peanut munchers wannabess as the home page re-writes the URL and it clearly shows .html, but we are all assuming that they can read !!!

113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:12:35 +0930] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 302 -
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:12:36 +0930] "GET /xyz.htm HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:17 +0930] "GET /contact.html HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:17 +0930] "GET /contact.asp HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /contact.htm HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /contact.aspx HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /contact.php HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /main.jsp HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /main.html HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /main.htm HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /main.aspx HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /main.asp HTTP/1.1" 404 159
113.116.87.67 www.xyz.com.au - [05/Feb/2015:14:14:18 +0930] "GET /main.php HTTP/1.1" 404 159

Just in case the monkeys don't understand the web site is not actually xyz domain.

Monkeys from China .cn - Shanghai Yovole Networks Inc. - 175.102.9.100 - 175.102.0.0 - 175.103.0.0

The ACE  27 January 2015 07:48:13 AM
More monkeys from China .cn TCPIP address 175.102.9.100 - 175.102.0.0 - 175.103.0.0

We cant call them hackers as they have been doing this for years with no result, they couldn't hack their way into a wet paper bag, we cant understand how this is hacking, but, if you are paying peanuts this is what you get !!!

SPAM database lookup
db.wpbl.info not listed good 
dnsbl-1.uceprotect.net listed error 
psbl.surriel.com not listed good 
recent.dnsbl.sorbs.net not listed good 
smtp.dnsbl.sorbs.net not listed good 
Number of SPAM hosts on 175.102.8.0/21 3






Blocklist lookup
Adult hosting not listed good 
Dshield droplist not listed good 
Hackers, Spyware, Botnets etc. listed error 
Open proxy not listed good 
Spamhaus droplist not listed good





175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:37 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:39 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:41 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:42 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:44 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:46 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:48 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:49 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:51 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:53 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:54 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:56 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:54:58 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:00 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:01 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:03 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:05 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:07 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:09 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:10 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:12 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:14 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:15 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:17 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:19 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:21 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:22 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:24 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:26 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:28 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:29 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:31 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:33 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:34 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:36 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:38 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:39 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:41 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:43 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:45 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:47 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:48 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:50 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:52 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:53 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:55 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:57 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:55:58 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:00 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:02 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:04 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:05 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:07 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:09 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:11 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:12 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:14 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:16 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:18 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:20 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:21 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:23 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:25 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:27 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:28 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:30 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:32 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:33 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:35 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:37 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:39 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:40 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:42 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:44 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:45 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:47 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:49 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:51 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:52 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:54 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:56 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:57 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:56:59 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:01 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:03 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:04 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:06 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:08 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:10 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:11 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:13 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:15 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:16 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:18 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:20 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:22 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:23 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:25 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:27 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:29 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:30 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:32 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:34 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:36 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:37 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:39 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:41 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:42 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:44 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:46 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:47 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:49 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:51 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:53 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:54 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:56 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:57:58 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admi n" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:00 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:01 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:03 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:05 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:07 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:08 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:10 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:12 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:14 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:15 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:17 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:19 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:20 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:22 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:24 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:26 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:27 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:29 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:31 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:33 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:34 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:36 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:38 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:40 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:41 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:43 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:45 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:46 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:48 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:50 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:52 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:53 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:55 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:57 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:58:58 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:00 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:02 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:03 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:05 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:07 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:09 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:10 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:12 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:14 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:16 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:17 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:19 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:21 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:22 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:24 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:26 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:28 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:29 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:31 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:33 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:35 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:36 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:38 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:40 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:42 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:43 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:45 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:47 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:48 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:50 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:52 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:54 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:55 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:57 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:06:59:59 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:00 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:02 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:04 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:06 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:07 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:09 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:11 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:13 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:14 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:16 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:18 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:20 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:21 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:23 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:25 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:27 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:28 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:30 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:32 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:34 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:35 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:37 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:39 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:40 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:42 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:44 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:46 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:47 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:49 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:51 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:53 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:54 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:56 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:00:58 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:00 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:01 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:03 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:05 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:06 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:08 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:10 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:12 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:13 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:15 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:17 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:18 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:20 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223
175.102.9.100 1.1.1.1 "admin" [27/Jan/2015:07:01:22 +0930] "GET /manager/html HTTP/1.1" 401 223

Monkeys who work on the internet in China - 121.40.209.122 - php scripts

The ACE  22 December 2014 06:48:20 PM
There seems to be a lot of monkeys working on the internet in china (.cn) who have no idea how the internets internetworking works :)

They have been trying for years to 'crack' our php servers, but this never works, I have posted about this before, but, I guess they cannot read !!!

121.40.209.122 4.3.2.1 - [22/Dec/2014:18:44:37 +0930] "GET /aoao/aoa/ao.php HTTP/1.1" 404 1182
121.40.209.122 4.3.2.1 - [22/Dec/2014:18:44:41 +0930] "GET /phpMyAdmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 1182
121.40.209.122 4.3.2.1 - [22/Dec/2014:18:44:42 +0930] "GET /pma/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 1182
121.40.209.122 4.3.2.1 - [22/Dec/2014:18:44:44 +0930] "GET /myadmin/scripts/setup.php HTTP/1.1" 404 1182


Web Site Privacy Policy

The ACE  14 November 2014 09:07:40 AM
If you are involved in a blog or web site with all the security breaches we seem to be hearing about daily, you need to have a very clear privacy policy / proclamation.

Here is one you might like to 'refresh' to your own liking :)

We are  (This Site) committed to protecting your privacy while you are visiting our Site.

Personal Details

Visitors can browse, use the search features of our site or telephone our call centre for assistance without supplying any personal details. The amount of assistance we can give without some personal details will be greatly limited.

Security

We maintain a high level of security and want you to feel comfortable with our policy regarding the collection, storage, transmission and use of any personal details collected in the course of handling your enquiry or doing business with you. In order to provide assistance, you will be asked to supply the minimum of personal details necessary to complete the transaction, such as your full name, address, phone number, email address, credit card type and number and expiration date. Your personal information will not be shared with any supplier/s unless authorised by you. Your phone number and email address may be used for advice notices regarding the services we provide to you.

Storage of your Details

Because we realise how important the security of your personal information is, the storage of names, addresses and phone numbers (THIS SITE DOES NOT RETAIN CREDIT CARD DETAILS) are held on our secure servers in our state-of-the-art data centre which has multiple levels of security including video surveillance, 24hour security staff, bomb proof building, biometric staff authentication, reinforced structure, security breach protection. Flood, fire, intrusion detection and protection systems. We will permit only authorised employees, who are trained in the handling of personal data, to have access to your personal information.

Transmission of your details

We exercise great care in providing secure transmission of your personal information. THIS SITE uses S/MIME and standard SSL 128-bit RC4 encryption technology to encode all personal information relating to clients when it travels over public networks.

General security

We have made every effort to secure your information but have no control over the security of the internet as a whole, other web sites, ISP's or your own system, so we cannot give a 100% guarantee. We do recommend that users of the internet follow good security practices and maintain regular virus checks of their systems with good antivirus programs using the latest virus definitions and the regular use of freely available software to remove any malicious files, popup advertising, diallers, malicious tracking cookies, trojan virus's etc. from your system. Depending on your software, all relevant security patches/updates should be installed. Note: our internal software utilises different code and is less likely to be effected by these world wide security threats.

Market Research

We may perform market research from time to time in an effort to improve our service and performance to our clients and suppliers. This market research may be performed by our own staff or a third party may be asked to conduct market research analysis on our behalf. Only the minimum details required for this market research and analysis will be supplied to any third party and will be covered by confidentiality agreements to protect your details.

What we will not do

THIS SITE will not sell or rent your personal information including your email address to any third parties.

Pop Up Advertising

The THIS SITE web site does not employ or encourage pop up advertising but we have no control over sites which we do not own that may be linked to our site.

Information Collected

When you visit the THIS SITE web site, we like many other internet sites record statistical information about your visit such as your IP address, country of origin and the number of pages visited etc. This information is used to analyse web traffic and does not record any personal information.

Your personal details may be disclosed if:

You violate our terms and conditions, cause harm or nuisance to other users or suppliers, violate any law, rule or regulation regarding credit card fraud and violation of any other current law or regulation, or if required by law or regulatory authority or court order.

In the event that this company is sold or taken over or assets acquired, our database including your details may be transferred to another company or entity.

Not Covered by this Privacy Policy

Links to sites not maintained by us, or in the course of completing a transaction, the use of the selected third party companies or entities that we do not own or control, may have a different Privacy Policy and standard to ours. We recommend you review their respective privacy policies before supplying them with your personal details.

Comments or Questions

If you wish to make any comments about our Privacy Policy or have any questions or concerns, please email us at: privacy@webenhanced.com
Changes to This Privacy Policy

We may need to change the wording, add to, or delete sections of this policy and this could happen at any time for any reason. Any changes will be posted to this site and will take effect immediately. If any changes relate to the way we use or store your personal information, we will post an advisory notice on our home page. We recommend regular review of our privacy policy to keep up to date with any alterations.

Microsoft DOS systeminfo and and example .bat file RemoteSysInfo.bat

The ACE  13 November 2014 01:32:16 PM
This is an example of how to use systeminfo as a batch file

systeminfo /s 192.1.1.140 / u barossa\the.use /p password

systeminfo /s 192.1.1.142 / u barossa\the.use /p password

or

the DOS batch file (.bat) - RemoteSysInfo.bat

@echo off
setlocal enableextensions
for /f %%s in ('type "serverlist.txt"') do call :PROCESS %%s
goto :END

:PROCESS
systeminfo /s %1 /u domain\the.user /p password > %1.info
goto :EOF

:END
endlocal


try our professional .bat file using serverlist.txt

192.1.1.140
192.1.1.142

Boomaroo.NET are proud to announce they have recently inked a deal with a major engineering company to host in the cloud their Web Sites and Office Systems

The ACE  12 November 2014 09:46:32 AM
Boomaroo.NET are proud to announces they have recently inked a deal with a major engineering company to host in the cloud their Web Sites and Office Systems.

After years of development and many prototypes, Boomaroo.NET have time tested a cloud offering that customers are finishing ticks all the right boxes.

The identity of the Major Engineering Company will be announced shortly.

Chinese relay monkeys ( 118.249.12.188 ) - 126.com , sina.cn , 21cn.com , sohu.com

The ACE  3 September 2014 07:32:09 AM
We are wondering for how long these chinese ( cn ) relay monkeys are going to keep attempting to relay off of our SMTP servers ???

03/09/2014 07:23:09 AM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,3526 to x.x.x.x:25
03/09/2014 07:23:16 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-1474] Attempt to relay mail to zgwj_pw@126.com rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:17 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-14FC] Attempt to relay mail to zgwj_pw@126.com rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:17 AM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,3526 to x.x.x.x:25


03/09/2014 07:23:18 AM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,3821 to x.x.x.x:25
03/09/2014 07:23:23 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-1474] Attempt to relay mail to zgwj_pw@126.com rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:24 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-1474] Attempt to relay mail to zgwj_pw@126.com rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:24 AM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,3821 to x.x.x.x:25


03/09/2014 07:23:25 AM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,3956 to x.x.x.x:25
03/09/2014 07:23:30 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-14FC] Attempt to relay mail to wpcsj@sina.cn rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:31 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-14FC] Attempt to relay mail to wpcsj@sina.cn rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:31 AM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,3956 to x.x.x.x:25


03/09/2014 07:23:32 AM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,4085 to x.x.x.x:25
03/09/2014 07:23:37 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-14FC] Attempt to relay mail to peixunbu2006@21cn.com rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:38 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-14FC] Attempt to relay mail to peixunbu2006@21cn.com rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:38 AM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,4085 to x.x.x.x:25


03/09/2014 07:23:39 AM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,4327 to x.x.x.x:25
03/09/2014 07:23:44 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-1474] Attempt to relay mail to maticli@sohu.com rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:45 AM  SMTP Server [011C:0008-1474] Attempt to relay mail to maticli@sohu.com rejected for policy reasons. Relays to recipient's domain denied in your configuration.
03/09/2014 07:23:45 AM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 118.249.12.188,4327 to x.x.x.x:25

khemistry.com.au - open relay host

The ACE  27 August 2014 04:21:35 PM
So we have been getting attempts to send us spam from Khemistry, so what I hear you say :)

Well have a look at these guys site - http://khemistry.com.au - 07 3852 5642

I called them up to tell them they are leaking spam & I got the "We are gurus", "We are a web development company", basically they are telling me I am an idiot !!!

So there web site is unusable and they wont even listen to anyone who is trying to help them securing their infrastructure.

I would suggest that anyone thinking of engaging them should look to someone else, they are going to get you into a lot of pain on the net.

iNotes (IBM) Vs OWA (M$)

The ACE  25 June 2014 09:46:14 AM
So comparing OWA with iNotes is a lay down mozare

 - iNotes - 50%
 - OWA,  - 50%

And the winner is Android and Tablet,and on the go (OTG) !!!

IBMs iNotes and Microsofts (M$) outlook web access (OWA) are so similar unless you are using all of the cloud 360 :)


googleusercontent.com

The ACE  7 April 2014 12:34:11 PM
Google started storing in a new domain, called googleusercontent.com.  

The googleusercontent.com domain is used for a variety of purposes, including cached copies of websites visited by the Google search engine, but the general purpose of this domain appears to be to store static content: i.e. content that is not expected to change.

23.236.57.86 xxxyyy.com - [07/Apr/2014:12:32:10 +0930] "GET / HTTP/1.0" 302 -
23.236.57.86 xxxyyy.com - [07/Apr/2014:12:32:11 +0930] "GET /ozepay.htm HTTP/1.0" 200 1453

23.236.51.68 xxxyy.com - [07/Apr/2014:12:38:47 +0930] "GET / HTTP/1.0" 302 -
23.236.51.68 xxxyy.com - [07/Apr/2014:12:38:47 +0930] "GET /nigelgrant.htm HTTP/1.0" 200 2006

Check they are with Google 'Content'

http://www.tcpiputils.com/browse/ip-address/23.236.57.86
Image:googleusercontent.com

Shame on you iiNet, not DNS Internetworking

The ACE  5 April 2014 12:32:03 PM
http://www.iinet.net.au/status/fault.php?id=3054227

Fault Notice 3054227

Areas: Australia,

Updated at: 2014-04-05 07:59:22 WST

Estimated Time of Commencement:

2014-02-04 12:00:00 WST

Description:
DNS:

Some Customers may have experienced timeouts or errors when attempting to access websites or check email.

Technical Summary: 

Engineers have identified an increase in DNS requests causing excessive load on the iiNet DNS servers.

Resolution:

Engineers are currently investigating a possible recurrence of DNS traffic issues.

Summary of updates:


Update 04/04 19:41 WST : This DNS event is still resolved, yet being monitored.

Update 04/04 19:00 WST : We have identified a spike of DNS traffic reoccurring ,Engineers are continuing to investigate the issue

Update 27/03 18:00 WST : We have identified a spike of DNS traffic reoccurring in Victoria,Engineers are continuing to investigate the issue

Update 10/02 4:15 PM WST: This issue has been resolved, however close monitoring is still being performed.

Update 08/02 3:50PM WST: This issue is still being monitored closely. 

Update 06/02 04:30PM WST: This issue hasn't reoccurred. Engineers are still monitoring the issue closely. Update 05/02 05:50PM WST: Engineers have applied a workaround to reduce traffic to the DNS farm. A solution to prevent re-occurrences is continuing to be investigated.

Update 05/02 04:00PM WST: We have identified large spike of DNS traffic reoccurring, Engineers are continuing to investigate the issue at the highest priority.

Update 05/02 12:03PM WST: Engineers are still investigating to identify the root cause of the issue.

Update 04/02 09:30PM WST: The impact of this DNS issue has been resolved, however we are waiting upon confirmation of the root cause.

Network Engineers have isolated additional traffic to the iiNet DNS farm while Systems Engineers investigate the root cause.

Estimated Time of Restoration:

2014-04-05 17:00:00 WST

Mirrored domain names - smetsys.systems

The ACE  23 March 2014 02:18:53 PM
No not Microsoft (M$) Developer Network, its a Mirrored Domain Name. like smetsys.systems


112.140.179.137 - digitalabsolute.com.au - mtatt@tpg.com.au - admin@prospectingaustralia.com.au - Matthew Tatt

The ACE  4 March 2014 09:28:48 PM
This guy is so impressed with himself it is amazing he has not pissed someone else off and they have DDOSed him into oblivion

He - Matthew Tatt - mtatt@tpg.com.au and admin@prospectingaustralia.com.au runs a PHP forum called prospectingaustralia.com.au

But he has no idea how to configure SMTP / HTTP infrastructure.

He has one shared TCPIP address - 112.140.179.137

This is his idea of a MX record

mail.prospectingaustralia.com.au

Yes - just one record & here is the kicker its weighting is '0' yes Zero.

He does not use round robin DNS, well you cant with one static IP, but the one A record he has, yes one A record, I guess he is to busy managing his forum has a TTL of 4 hours, I think this is the default for Netregistry

We would be very happy to kick in some cash for a DDOS :)

Anyone interested ???

The obstacles holding back the adoption of microservers

The ACE  25 February 2014 07:07:59 PM
The obstacles holding back the adoption of microservers

Server vendors and Chip makers are stirring things up in the microserver market, but many factors are hampering there widespread adoption.  

hero 
Image: HP





Microservers take the familiar concept of the blade server, which essentially puts multiple servers into one physical chassis for shared power and cooling, to another level. A Dell microserver chassis, for example, houses 12 physical servers in 3U of rack space, theoretically lowering space, cooling, and hardware costs. However, there are several challenges to widespread microserver adoption. Here are some of them.

Competing against virtualization


Facebook and others have largely proven that a giant farm of microservers or a similar technology is the best way to handle millions of concurrent web requests, but that doesn't mean a move away from virtualization is appropriate for every data center. Many companies have invested significantly in their virtualized infrastructure, and microservers return us to the days of the physical server. There is certainly some overhead to virtualization, in both technical and human terms, but a pool of physical servers also poses its own challenges.

Moving to the cloud


Companies are increasingly hesitant about owning fixed IT assets like data centers and their racks of servers. In extreme cases, I've encountered clients who want to own no IT infrastructure other than networks that connect their leased end-user devices to cloud services. A rack full of microservers now competes against a cloud provider, which in some cases allows you to simply write a check and let someone else worry about the debates concerning which hardware to select and how to provision and maintain it.

Open Compute


Technology companies like Facebook have been pioneering nontraditional servers for a number of years and have launched the Open Compute platform, which specifies designs for servers targeted toward high-density web service providers. While Open Compute is arguably a distinct physical platform versus microservers, it's targeted toward a similar market and presents early adopters with a major, divergent choice between Open Compute and microservers.

Unfamiliarity


Microservers bring a fairly new hardware form factor to the data center, eschewing the blade concept that's been in place for a number of years. While the concepts are fundamentally the same, everyone from data center designers to front-line operators will have to learn new design and operational considerations.

Managing workloads


One of the great benefits of technologies like virtualization is that you can dynamically allocate processor and memory resources as workloads shift. With microservers, you are physically committed to a fixed level of resources once you place your order. With effective planning and workload balancing tools in front of your servers, this may be an easy task. But for other workloads, you may struggle to break them into chunks that can be processed in parallel.

A gunfight at the processor corral


The mainstream X86 server market has basically standardized around Intel processors, with AMD grabbing limited market share. Intel's server chips are powerful beasts with well-understood capabilities. In the microserver market, Intel has introduced lower-powered versions of its traditional server chips, as well as a "server-grade" version of the Atom chip. However, the ARM-based chips that dominate mobile phones and tablets are also making a play for the data center, and workloads that are targeted at microservers seem perfect for ARM designs. Companies may consider waiting out the first few generations in the microserver market until a processor architecture becomes standardized.

Sizing


Sizing traditional servers is a known commodity. Most vendors and implementation providers have proven sizing tools that quickly determine server and processor configurations. With microservers being somewhat new to the market, you or your partner may be taking a bit of a guess with sizing a microserver deployment — a guess that could be fairly expensive if done poorly.

The curse of the Atom


One of Intel's two classes of microserver processors uses the company's Atom branding. Recent Atom processors are excellent in terms of power consumption and processing capabilities for the right workloads, yet the brand still engenders skepticism, particularly from people with bad memories of the early days of the netbook craze. While it's patently unfair to discount the current generation of Atom processors, the brand alone will cause some to dismiss microservers.

Lack of clarity around workloads


Microservers have a compelling story around power and space savings, but when it comes to the types of workloads they're best equipped to handle, the story becomes a bit less clear. Since microserver processors generally eliminate some of the technology embedded in higher-end server chips, it's fairly obvious they're not the best choice for complex analytics or graphical calculations. Outside some well-defined niches, it's hard to tell if a microserver is the best choice. Most vendors mention areas like web serving or serving up virtual desktops, but they lack compelling use cases that show the savings that can be achieved by a microserver. After all, if a workload that could be accomplished with two traditional blades takes four or five microservers, savings may be illusory at best.

A product looking for a market?


I can't shake the feeling that the microserver might be a product in search of a market. Sure, there are niche markets where the microserver might fit nicely. But you're paying a premium for technology that's yet to be fully standardized, has complexities around workload, and is new to the market. The upshot for vendors is that they can charge a slightly higher price since microservers have not been subjected to the brutal competition and commoditization of the standard X86-based server market. Unless you're a high-volume web provider or highly sensitive to power requirements, make sure there's a compelling case for the move to microservers before jumping onboard.

MAIL FROM: <test@live.com>

The ACE  23 February 2014 02:45:47 PM
I notice that many hackers have tried to 'investigate' our No Spam Accepted (NSA) SMTP security system over the past 5+ years. Many have tried and all of them have failed to collect the $50,000.00 we offer to anyone that can send us spam.

One of the dumber ones I will call monkey hacker 'test', has been testing NSA by sending emails from lots of different TLD's, domains in BLs & not BLs, no hostname & hostnames with no valid TLD's etc. etc. etc. lots of different permutations of these configuration items.

However, one common think about all of theirs attempts is that they use -: MAIL FROM:

So they would have us believe that they have an account with Microsoft (M$) called test, I think not, no were are not dumb monkeys like you, we are very smart, much smarter than that :)

I can not image that M$ would allow anyone on there network to have an account called 'test' and what if NSA did not accept any emails from any accounts called 'test', then the last 6+ months of their investigations (tests) have been a complete waste of time.

I guess that is why these monkey hacker are still banging their head against the wall & scoffing down peanuts, they are just not very smart !!!

Speed up your web surfing for free

The ACE  14 January 2014 07:57:04 PM
Get an alternative Domain Name Server (DNS) provider for faster web browsing at your Small Office Home Office (SOHO). 

The average internet connection speed in the United States has more than doubled in the past five years. Akamai’s “State of the Internet” site reports that speeds increased from 4,163 kpbs to 8,675 kbps between 2008 and 2013 (Q2 data).

Web app users appreciate the difference: a faster connection means faster apps.

Faster ISP: One way to upgrade your connection speed is to call to your internet service provider -- or a competitor. In most cities, if you pay a bit more, you can get a faster connection. This may be less feasible in rural areas.

Faster network hardware: New network hardware also may provide faster performance. A high-speed router and firewall are essential, as are client systems (and devices) that support high-bandwidth connections.

Faster DNS: You might get an internet performance boost by changing one setting: the Domain Name Server, or DNS, address. For less-technical folks, think of the DNS as a web-site search service: every time you request a website, your DNS provider translates your request into numbers and routes your computer to the requested site’s servers.
When you change the DNS setting on your router (or device), you change where your router “looks up” servers on the internet (i.e., DNS translates “www.techrepublic.com” into numerical server addresses). It doesn’t change the bandwidth of your connection. Instead, your router sends requests to a faster DNS server, which means you spend less time waiting for a DNS server to respond. The decreased wait feels like increased speed.

Small businesses or home users typically use the default DNS server of their internet service provider, but other DNS providers are often faster.

Identify alternative DNS servers


Google hosts Namebench, “an open-source DNS benchmark utility” that runs on Mac, Windows and Unix systems (see: https://code.google.com/p/namebench/). Download it, install it, then run it.

Namebench returns response times from many well-known DNS services. Some of these services may provide significantly faster response times than your existing configuration. DNS response times typically take milliseconds.
 

a-Namebench.jpg 
Namebench tests DNS server response times

Change DNS settings

On most networks, there are two places to change DNS settings: on a router (or system serving as a router), or on the client machine. In most cases, you’ll want to make the change on the router, so that all connected machines will benefit from the new setting. Router settings are typically reached by typing the router’s local IP address (often 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1).

In particular, I suggest you consider both OpenDNS and Google’s DNS servers as viable alternatives. These provide slightly different services.
Google DNS

(at 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4)

Google offers public DNS aimed at providing speed and security. Change your DNS settings to the above settings to route your DNS requests to their servers. Google has configured their system to attempt to protect against both spoofing and denial of service attacks. Learn more athttps://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/.

b-GooglePublicDNS.jpg 
Google’s public DNS servers offer an alternative to your ISP’s DNS servers

OpenDNS

(at 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220)

OpenDNS serves DNS info from at 20 different locations around the world (see the locations and status here: http://208.69.38.170). OpenDNS also protects against spoofing and denial of service attacks, but also extends into the area of web filtering. Change your DNS settings to the IP addresses listed above to route DNS requests to OpenDNS. OpenDNS may be configured to warn, or even block, users when certain websites are requested. OpenDNS offers paid versions of the service for home users and businesses.
 

c-OpenDNS.jpg 
OpenDNS offers reliable free DNS services in addition to paid filtering and security options

Test results

After you’ve made the change, test the results. The simplest way to do this is to reboot, then connect to the internet. Run an internet speed test (e.g., Speedtest.net) to check your connection’s performance. Pay particular attention to the “ping time”: a lower ping time combined with consistent download and upload speeds is a good indication that things are working.

You also should test commonly used media services, such as web meeting tools or, for home users, music and video streaming services (e.g., iTunes, Netflix, Amazon Prime, and Hulu+). Make sure all services that worked before the change also work smoothly after. If things dont work as expected, you can always revert back to using your ISP’s DNS settings.

An excellent end-of-year project

The holidays make an excellent time to test alternative DNS settings -- both at your small business or at home. For tech folks visiting family, this is one way to share your expertise. The gift of faster web browsing may be something appreciated the rest of the year.

order-tracking89234.com - Chinese Monkeys trying to steal your money

The ACE  12 January 2014 09:07:21 AM
So we received a couple of very dodgy emails about a couple of domains, asking for $75.00

Their main TCPIP address seems to be - 220.164.140.243
Country China , CN , AS
City Beijing
Postal Code
Coordinates 39.9289 , 116.3883
ISP Data Communication Division
Organization CHINANET Yunnan province network
Region Beijing , 22
Timezone Asia/Harbin




What ever you do, do not pay them for their search engine optimisation (SEO) service they are going to do nothing except spend your hard earned money.

Sample invoice they sent to us.


Expiration Notice


Order #: 1456
Order Date: Jan 11, 2014
Bill To: Domain Privacy
PO Box 119
Beaconsfield, VIC
3807
390555557
Domain Name
XYZ.COM
Registration
Jan 11, 2014 - Jan 11, 2015
Price
$75.00
Term
1 Year


Domain: XYZ.COM

To: Domain Privacy

Don't miss out on this offer which includes search engine submission for XYZ.COM for 12 months. There is no obligation to pay for this order unless you complete your payment by Jan 26, 2014. Our services provide submission and search engine ranking for domain owners. This offer for submission services is not required to renew your domain registration.

Failure to complete your search engine registration by Jan 26, 2014 may result in the cancellation of this order (making it difficult for your customers to locate you using search engines on the web).

Howto make Email Work For You

The ACE  6 January 2014 10:01:01 AM
Image:Make Email Work For You

"Email was destroying my life, so I destroyed email" wrote Zach Epstein in BGR last year. A sentiment many of us would share with Zach. And many of us will feel the same way as we head back into the office for the start of the 2014.

Many people, have adopted strategies for managing email, including:

I am going to recommend three great tools to increase the love you feel for your email inbox.

Newsle - News about your network


Image:Make Email Work For You

Newsle is a ravenously addictive product. The screenshot of my Gmail shows a month or so of Newsle mails in my inbox. I've opened every single one.

Newsle scans your contacts (in LinkedIn and Facebook) and pulls our news stories about them. This lets you keep up to date with your contacts - and provided your contact list is relevant and fresh - Newsle has proved to be the best tool I have found to do just that.

As many of my contacts are in my business (tech entrepreneurs, VCs, marketing execs), Newsle often gives me really helpful professional news that is highly relevant (because one of my contacts is involved in the story).

For the past few months, I have opened my Newsle emails religiously.

I highly recommend it. For a couple of minutes a day, it keeps me up to date on the business contacts most important to me.


Unroll me - manage mailing lists

Newsle is going to create a new email in your email inbox everyday. One you are going to want to read. But let's face it, over the years, we've all accumulated dozens of mailing lists subscriptions, from websites we tried once, retailers we once bought from and the crud that accumulates as our email address is sold time and again. Only if you do not provide a individual email address to each person, web site etc. as we do, more on this on a following blog post.

Unroll.Me is a system which aggregates your subscriptions to mailing list by peering into your emails inbox, and magically plucks them out before you have to turn your attention to them. Daily, Unroll.me well then send you a beautiful digest of all the mailing lists mails it has found.

You can configure Unroll.me and decide which emails you want 'unrolled' (sent into the aggregated summary) through a lovely web interface.

Unroll.me saves me several minutes every day by automatically eliminating low-value emails while leaving me feel confident that I won't lose these emails (if they turn out to be important.)

Boomerang - schedule your mail

Boomerang a simple plug-in for Gmail. It allows you to schedule sending an email and also trigger simple reminders on emails you send.

Why schedule emails? In my case, I often end up writing emails at inhospitable times (like late night on a Sunday night) which would ordinarily arrived with correspondents at similarly inhospitable times, buried under a nights worth of email. This is especially the case when corresponding to people in other time zones. Boomerang allows me to time the delivery of emails for when the recipient is most likely to see it.

Boomerang also has a nice power feature. You can ask it to remind you (via a simple email) if you don't receive a reply. It's pretty neat particularly when you run multiple projects and need to keep track of responses.

One drawback for Boomerang - it seems to only work with Gmail from the Web ,and isn't a tool readily accessible via iPhone.

Give this products a try. I'd love to hear your recommendations.

Alan Liddle is ignoring my email to al@adlsoftware.com

The ACE  4 January 2014 01:03:48 PM
So we had a very interesting 'download' of our blog - http://boomaroo.net, now this is a bit of quessing !!!

I sent an email to Alan Liddle about his ESMTP servers attempted spamming including a link to this blog entry - adlsoftware are spamming us - within minutes, someone has downloaded the whole of our blog (see below), so I am checking our web server logs and no one has done this before in the many years it has been published to the www.

What is really telling is that ADLsoftware.com appears to be using Yahoo as their cloud provider, 68.180.224.226 is a yahoo TCPIP, now everyone and there dog know how poorly Yahoo email has been over the past 5 years, but I am guessing they are really cheap.

Yahoo.com.tw was such a mess and we have blogged about them before - Relay monkeys - FROM: z2007tw@yahoo.com.tw - TO: vkihwpdh@yahoo.com.tw - 114.44.101.72 - that yahoo just closed it down !!!

Here on our security blog - blog.ozITsecurity.com.au is a post about why you should not use Yahoo for email - Yahoo email Hacked - again and again and again - I would suggest you should not be using them for anything now that the new CEO has proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that being primarily concerned about how you look http://www.cnbc.com/id/100968027 is going to be a receipt for disaster !!!

68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:31:56 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/dx/remotely-enabling-rdp.htm HTTP/1.1" 200 32915
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:31:57 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=hsh5sgbh%40yahoo.com.sg&type=cat&cat=hsh5sgbh%40yahoo.com.sg HTTP/1.1" 200 30802
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:00 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=111.252.246.158&type=cat&cat=111.252.246.158 HTTP/1.1" 200 30784
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:03 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Pirooz%20Leen%20LLC&type=cat&cat=Pirooz%20Leen%20LLC HTTP/1.1" 200 30705
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:03 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Blog&type=cat&cat=Blog HTTP/1.1" 200 30806
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:04 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Web%20Sites%20Maintenance%20&type=cat&cat=Web%20Sites%20Maintenance%20 HTTP/1.1" 200 30750
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:04 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Clare%20Gilbert%20Valley%20&type=cat&cat=Clare%20Gilbert%20Valley%20 HTTP/1.1" 200 30798
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:04 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=vkihwpdh%40yahoo.com.tw&type=cat&cat=vkihwpdh%40yahoo.com.tw HTTP/1.1" 200 30852
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:05 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=pereajsng%40yahoo.com.hk&type=cat&cat=pereajsng%40yahoo.com.hk HTTP/1.1" 200 30858
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:06 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Microsoft&type=cat&cat=Microsoft HTTP/1.1" 200 31032
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:09 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Page%20Titles&type=cat&cat=Page%20Titles HTTP/1.1" 200 30781

68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:12 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Hotmail&type=cat&cat=Hotmail HTTP/1.1" 200 30665
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:15 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/webadmin?open&login HTTP/1.1" 200 1512
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:16 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Mark%20Garlipp&type=cat&cat=Mark%20Garlipp HTTP/1.1" 200 30918
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:19 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Email%20in%20the%20Cloud&type=cat&cat=Email%20in%20the%20Cloud HTTP/1.1" 200 30963
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:20 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Email%20&type=cat&cat=Email%20 HTTP/1.1" 200 31359
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:21 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=DNS&type=cat&cat=DNS HTTP/1.1" 200 30965
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:23 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&type=Month&month=6&year=2013&title=June%202013& HTTP/1.1" 200 31425
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:23 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Chunghwa%20Telecom&type=cat&cat=Chunghwa%20Telecom HTTP/1.1" 200 30842
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:24 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=lightandlifephotos.com&type=cat&cat=lightandlifephotos.com HTTP/1.1" 200 30737
68.180.224.226 www.boomaroo.net - [04/Jan/2014:11:32:25 +0930] "GET /0-DB/Prod/boomaroo/boomaroo-blog.nsf/archive?openview&title=Business%20Name&type=cat&cat=Business%20Name HTTP/1.1" 200 30715
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LiMux project - How Muncih said goodbye to Microsoft Software Stack

The ACE  20 November 2013 09:47:31 AM
Breaking up with Microsoft is hard to do. Just ask Peter Hofmann, the man leading the City of Munich's project to ditch Windows and Office in favour of open source alternatives.

The project took close to a decade to complete, has seen the city wrestle with legal uncertainties and earned Munich a visit from Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, whose pleas to the mayor of Germany's third largest city not to switch fell on deaf ears.

Munich says the move to open source has saved it more than €10m, a claim contested by Microsoft, yet Hofmann says the point of making the switch was never about money, but about freedom.

"If you are only doing a migration because you think it saves you money there's always somebody who tells you afterwards that you didn't calculate it properly," he said.

"Our main goal was to become independent." 
Peter Hoffman, project lead

"That was the experience of a lot of open source-based projects that have failed," Hofmann noted. They were only cost-driven and when the organisation got more money or somebody else said 'The costs are wrong' then the main reason for doing it had broken away. That was never the main goal within the City of Munich. Our main goal was to become independent."

Munich is used to forging its own path. The city runs its own schools and is one of the few socialist, rather than conservative governments, in Bavaria.

Peter Hofmann speaks in Berlin
Peter Hofmann speaks about Munich's open source migration at the Linux Tag conference in Berlin.
 Image: Stefan Krempl

Becoming independent meant Munich freeing itself from closed, proprietary software, more specifically the Microsoft Windows NT operating system and the Microsoft Office suite, and a host of other locked-down technologies the city relied on in 2002.

The decision to ditch Microsoft was also born of necessity. In 2002 the council knew official support for Windows NT, the OS used on 14,000 staff machines at the council, would soon run out. The council ordered a study of the merits of switching to XP and Office versus a GNU/Linux OS, OpenOffice and other free software.

As well as being tied to Windows upgrades, Munich faced becoming more tightly locked into the Microsoft ecosystem with each passing year, Hofmann said.

"Windows has developed from a pure PC-centred operating system, like Windows 3.11 was, to a whole infrastructure. If you're staying with Microsoft you're getting more and more overwhelmed to update and change your whole IT infrastructure [to fit with Microsoft]," according to Hofmann, whether that be introducing a Microsoft Active Directory system or running a key management server.

"If you're staying with Microsoft you're getting more and more overwhelmed to update and change your whole IT infrastructure." 
Peter Hoffman

Free software was ruled the better choice by Munich's ruling body, principally because it would free the council from dependence on any one vendor and future-proof the council's technology stack via open protocols, interfaces and data formats.

The prospect of such a high profile loss, and other organisations following Munich's lead, spurred Microsoft to mount a last ditch campaign to win the authority back. A senior sales executive at the time told general managers in EMEA "under NO circumstances lose against Linux." Steve Ballmer himself took time out of a skiing holiday to make a revised offer in March 2003, followed two months later by Microsoft knocking millions of Euros off the price of sticking with Windows and Office.

The lobbying failed to change Munich's mind, and in June 2004 the council gave the go-ahead to begin the migration from NT and Office 97/2000 to a Linux-based OS, a custom-version of OpenOffice, as well as a variety of free software, such as the Mozilla Firefox browser, Mozilla Thunderbird e-mail client and the Gimp photo editing software. It became known as the LiMux project, after the name for the custom Linux OS the council was rolling out.

Making sense of the IT zoo

Nine years is a long time for a desktop migration by anyone's standards, but the LiMux project was always going to be more than a simple transition.

Microsoft's Steve Ballmer
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer came to Munich and made the case for sticking with Microsoft software.
 Image: James Martin/CNET

Originally planned as a soft roll out that would be complete by 2011, the project was extended when it became clear that the migration to free software would be more challenging than first thought.

The complexity came down to the way IT was managed at Munich: twenty two different units handling IT for different parts of the council and each with differences in the Windows clients and other software they used, varying patch levels and no common directory, user, system or hardware management.

"[The council] had 22 different units with their own IT, with totally different kinds of systems for the networking, operating and user directories. It was all a big zoo,” said Hofmann, adding there was no detailed overview of the hardware each user relied upon or the software they needed to do their job.

Without a clear picture of its IT estate, Munich found it was taking too long to deal with unexpected problems thrown up when rolling out LiMux.

"If you set up an old PC with the new system you'd start recognising 'Whoops, that isn't there or there's hardware that needs to be reconfigured' and at that stage that's clearly too late. You have to know what's going on before you roll it out."

"We planned a slow migration, carrying out the migration and the development of our LiMux client in parallel." 
Peter Hoffman

Munich chose to standardise processes for capturing each department's infrastructure and requirements and for testing and release management, at the cost of adding several years to the project's completion date.

"That took a large amount of time to get over these heterogeneous systems," said Hofmann.

A single unit was put in charge of maintaining and supporting the LiMux client, as well as implementing and providing common tools for user and system management.
The nature of the project had changed, from a desktop migration to cleaning up much of Munich's IT infrastructure and the way it was managed – a move in keeping with the council's motto for the project: "Quality over time".

In spite of the delay in completing the project, Hofmann said the authority had always planned to take its time.

"We never planned to carry out a big bang migration. From the start we planned a slow migration, carrying out the migration and the development of our LiMux client in parallel."

LiMux logo
Munich focused on The IT Evolution as the logo for its custom Linux platform.

The time taken to complete the project is one of many reasons that Microsoft has attacked Munich's move to LiMux. Areport criticising the project, produced by HP for Microsoft, claimed the Redmond software giant could migrate 50 to 500 desktop PCs per day if upgrading to a Microsoft OS and office, suite compared to the eight per day it said was being achieved under the LiMux project.

However, by Hofmann's reckoning, that slow and steady migration is one of the reasons the project has largely managed to stay within its budget with minimal disruption. The project finished within budget in October 2013, with more than 14,800 staff migrated to using Limux and more than 15,000 to OpenOffice.

Retooling for Linux

A myriad technical challenges emerged as Munich tried to reconfigure an infrastructure littered with proprietary formats and protocols to play nicely with LiMux and free software.
Large chunks of the software used by the council were built using Microsoft technologies. For example, a sizeable proportion of Microsoft Office macros were written in Microsoft's programming language Visual Basic, while other departments were tied to Internet Explorer by a dependence on ActiveX. This preponderance of lock-in interfaces was described as "awful" in 2010 by then deputy head of the LiMux project Florian Schiessl. 

LiMux screenshot
This screenshot of LiMux shows the major customization that Munich has done to Ubuntu.

As would be expected, the council has had to shell out a chunk of change on getting applications to work on LiMux – a custom-build of the Ubuntu flavor of Linux – some €774,000 as of last year.

At the time the migration started, the council used about 300 common office software programs, such as web browsers and e-mail clients, and 170 specialised apps tailored to different roles performed by the council. These specialised apps ranged from large-scale IT systems down to macros and templates linked to Microsoft Office.

Understandably, migrating these apps to run on the LiMux OS is one of the areas where choosing LiMux over Windows cost Munich, with the work on migrating apps to LiMux costing €200,000 more than porting them to a newer version of Windows.

Offsetting that is the estimated €6.8 million savings the council says it had made as of last year from not having to licence a new Microsoft OS and office suite.
The lion's share of Munich's applications, about 90 per cent, are accessible via LiMux. Most have been ported, while others are running as web apps, inside virtualised containers or via terminal servers.

A small number of apps have proven impossible to port, make accessible or switch away from – particularly software whose use is mandated by the German government – and have to be run directly on Windows machines.

While the council has weaned itself off the majority of Microsoft technologies, Munich still experiences friction where it rubs against proprietary software in widespread use elsewhere.

"We thought from the start we would have other organisations follow us but it's really not easy." 
Peter Hoffman

One of the main complaints from Munich staff using LiMux and OpenOffice is about incompatibilities with Microsoft Office. Documents, spreadsheets and other files display some fonts, pictures and layouts differently in OpenOffice than in Microsoft Office, and changes to some documents are not properly logged.

Munich hopes to ease some of these problems by moving all its OpenOffice users to LibreOffice, a process which will get underway at the end of this year. Munich has worked with other users of LibreOffice, including authorities in the German city of Freiburg and the Austrian capital Vienna, to pay for updates to LibreOffice that should improve interoperability with Microsoft's office suite.

The complexity of moving from proprietary software after years of being a Microsoft shop might explain why more organisations haven't followed in Munich's footsteps, and why some, like the German municipality of Freiburg, have given up on their own shift to open source. Last year Freiburg scrapped plans to move to OpenOffice claiming it would have cost up to €250 per seat to resolve interoperability issues.

"We thought from the start we would have other organisations follow us but it's really not easy," said Hofmann.

Cost

Hofmann's warning against justifying the jump to free software on cost alone seems well-grounded given how hotly Microsoft has contested costings for the programme.
Microsoft claims that, by its estimation, the LiMux project would have cost considerably more than Munich has said. The HP report for Microsoft put the project's price at €60.6m, far more than the €17m Microsoft claimed it would have cost to shift to Windows XP and a newer version of Microsoft Office.

LiMux migration timeline
Munich stands by its assertion that it has cost the council less to drop Microsoft than it would have to have stuck with it, and says Microsoft's figures are based on bogus assumptions.

The final cost will be released at the end of 2013, but in August 2013 Munich said it had cost €23m to shift to LiMux and OpenOffice. Munich says this is far less than the estimated €34m it said it would have cost to upgrade to Windows 7 and newer versions of Microsoft Office.

Where does the truth lie? Well Munich makes a good case for why much of the work carried out during the LiMux project would have been necessary if the council had decided to opt for a newer version of Windows, and how it has saved money on top.

By choosing to swap to LiMux and OpenOffice Munich was able to keep using its old PCs for longer, something that Hofmann said would not have been possible if it had chosen some of the recent versions of Microsoft Office and Windows 7.

Extending the lifespan of its PCs in this way had saved the council some €4.6m as of last year, according to its official figures.

And by Munich's reckoning, the same standardisation of the council's tech infrastructure and administration would have eventually been necessary whatever the OS and office suite chosen, said Hofmann.

LiMux workstations chart
Training thousands of the council's staff to use a new OS and software is another area where Munich believes the council would have faced equivalent costs for both Microsoft and LiMux – claiming it would have set them back €1.69m regardless of the system.

"If we would have switched to Microsoft Office, the costs for the e-learning platform would have been the same, and the new GUI for MS Office would have required the same amount of training," said Hofmann.

"[In fact] the GUI in OpenOffice is much more like MS Office 2000 than the new MS Office GUI."

Similarly the €6.1m bill for personnel to oversee the migration process would have remained the same regardless of whether the council moved to LiMux or a future Windows OS, in Munich's estimation. Currently up to 18 people work at any one time work on development and maintenance tasks relating to the operating system and office software for LiMux and Windows.

Freedom to work

While many businesses might balk at the thought of not having a support contract to pick up the pieces when their OS and office software goes wrong, Munich feels far from adrift, said Hofmann.

Munich's Victory Gate
Victory Gate is a symbol of the City of Munich. Its Linux migration declared victory in October 2013.
 Image: iStockphoto/tzeiler

A team of just 25 people at Munich develop, roll out and provide final support for the Ubuntu-based LiMux client. A larger number of people look after the everyday administration of the city's PCs but far fewer than the 1,000 people cited in the Microsoft/HP report as implementing the LiMux project.

The authority doesn't have a support deal for the LiMux client, but instead handles support itself with the help of various free software communities, such as those supporting Ubuntu, KDE, LibreOffice and OpenOffice.

"We are using the community way of support," said Hofmann. "We are finding it to be effective, mostly."

The model is allowing the council to help develop the software it uses in order that it better suit its needs.

"If you're only a customer with a support contract, it doesn't give you the ability to change how things are put into Ubuntu or LibreOffice," said Hofmann.
"That becomes more possible when you work with the community."

"We are using the community way of support." 
Peter Hoffman

The same staff who develop LiMux are also responsible for the last level of support, Hofmann said, adding the authority prizes the freedom it has to work out how to resolve problems on its own.

"We had an issue with OpenOffice in the past and a support contract wouldn't have helped us because nobody else has this sort of problem, so we would have had the choice to live with it or forget about it," said Hofmann.

Instead Munich paid a company to resolve the issue for them, and put the patch upstream.

"The only downside is there's no-one to blame when things do go wrong, but what's the advantage of that?" Hofmann said.

What does the future hold?

Now that the migration to LiMux is complete, Munich plans to continue developing LiMux (the next version is due out in summer 2014) and continue to incorporate changes made to the Ubuntu LTS release it's based upon. The authority will also continue to identify opportunities to migrate other apps to run on the LiMux client so it can further reduce its Microsoft footprint.

Picturesque Munich
Picturesque Munich is regularly ranked as one of the world's most liveable cities.
 Image: iStockphoto/Björn Kindler
 
Now that Munich is on a path to freeing itself from proprietary ties, Hofmann says he sees no compelling reason for the authority to ever go back.

"We saw from the start that if you're only relying on one contributor to supply your operating system, your office system and your infrastructure, you're stuck with it. You have to do what your contributor tells you to. If they say 'There's no longer support for your office version', you have to buy and implement a new one. You're no longer able to make those kinds of decisions by yourself."

He is hopeful that Munich will show other large organisations that it is possible to make the jump to free software and, while it is a difficult and time-consuming process, making it happen doesn't mean shutting down your IT.

"It's the best thing you can do. I've been asked 'How come you say you're up and running when Microsoft says you're already dead'," he said.
Hofmann's response: "It is possible to do an open source migration and still have the citizens not left alone. We're far from being dead."

www works, but the full domain does not !!!

The ACE  3 November 2013 04:53:07 PM
I really wish I had $1 for every time I have open a new browser window & paste in a url eg. http://yourbme.com.au and it does not work !!!

I found this job on the web site seek, notice they want someone who knows about DNS

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- Small Business Server 2003 >
- Exchange 2003 > (Active sync, Mobile & WEB access)
- SQL Server, DNS, DHCP, Active Directory, Group Policy
- Virtualisation
- Network - WAN, VPN, LAN, Remote Access
- Backup - Symantec Backup Exec, MS Backup, Novastor
- Antivirus and Anti-Spam, GFI, Kaspersky, CA, Vipre
- Enterprise Management
- Hardware – Standard PC, Corporate Workstations, Servers (Rack and Tower)
- Communication Cabinets
- IIS, HTML

Who We Are Looking For

If you meet the below criteria we would like to talk to you;

- Minimum of 2 years hands on experience in a technician support role
- Excellent communication and customer relations skills
- Great time management and reporting skills
- Can work autonomously
- Microsoft qualified or have substantially completed an MCSE course
- Clean driving record and possesses a current driver’s licence

Please note that due to the nature of this role, applicants will be required to undergo a police check and a medical may also be required.

What We Can Offer You

This is an opportunity for a savvy tech to gain broad experience within the industry and be a part of a successful, growing company. Initially, employment will be on a casual basis with the view to becoming full time after a qualifying period. Remuneration is flexible and will be based on experience. 

How to Apply

If you believe you have what it takes to be successful in this role please forward your resume and covering letter to applications@yourbme.com.au or click ‘Apply Now’.

All applications will be treated as confidential. Please note that only shortlisted applicants will be contacted


But, they do not know the basics them selves, they do not realise that every web site should have 2 x DNS entries at a minimum :)

The first one is www eg. www.yourbme.com.au and the 2nd one just the domain yourbme.com.au

What is really shocking about this is that these guys are selling their expertise to other business, so I am guessing all of their customers DNS is missing vital entries.

25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

The ACE  23 October 2013 07:55:14 AM
If you’re like me, you’re always on the search for the best way to simultaneously boost your productivity, stay organized, and expertly manage your time at work. Fortunately, there are a few ingenious ways to accomplish more at work on several different levels.

I’ve compiled a list of 25 office hacks you need to try today:

1. Sick of struggling to open heavily plasticized office supplies? Use a can opener to save you time and energy.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Wikipedia Commons

2. Use a variety of binder clips to keep the power cords around your desk untangled, organized, and out of the way. Attach the clips to your desktop or other surfaces and inserting the end of each cord to the silver looping structure.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

FavMy

3. Use twist ties, clawed hair clips, or any other small structure with clasps to organized your earbuds or any other kind of cords you have lying around. Twist the cord into a bun and place the clip at near the end of the cord.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Wikipedia Commons

4. Use a leftover bread tab to hold your spot on a roll of masking tape.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Tumblr

5. Who needs a tripod? Create a smartphone stand for hands-free video chatting or steady pictures by using an old cassette case.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Life Currents

6. Ramp up your online security by using non-English characters and letters in your passwords. You can create your own non-English characters using these codes or by copy-and-pasting.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Wikipedia Commons

7. When you’re looking for a permanent way to keep things in place around your office, try using Velcro strips.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Wikipedia Commons

8. Too many cords to keep track of? Color code them for easier use. Try using Perler beads, nail polish, or even colored Duct tape or washi tape.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Landee See, Landee Doo

9. If you’re staying late at the office and want to listen to the music on your smartphone, build a quick, cheap speaker using a toilet paper roll and thumbtacks.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

May Richer Fuller Be

10. Beat a sweet-tooth craving by baking a small-portion treat using a mug and the office microwave.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Melissa_Adams; Keep Recipes

11. No time to iron your shirt? Hair straighteners make perfect collar or hem irons. Smooth out hard-to-unwrinkle areas with the straightening iron, and dowse the rest of your shirt with wrinkle-release spray.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Charmaine Manansala; Flickr

12. Clean a dirty keyboard by using a piece of clear tape to get between the keys.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Real Simple

13. Stay hydrated at work by labeling your water bottle with hours and water-drinking calculations.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Statigr.am

14. Download Stay Focused, a browser add-on to keep you from drifting to time-wasting websites and losing focus when you’ve got deadlines.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

15. Finding time to exercise can be a struggle. Get some exercise in at your desk by replacing your chair with a large exercise ball or creating a standing desk.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Ramsey Beyer; Flickr

16. Create a DIY charging station for your phone or other electronics to ensure they don’t create even more clutter on your desk or in your office.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Make It & Love It

17. Fix wobbly office furniture by using old CDs to avoid wobbles and protect the carpet. They also make great coasters.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Crafts By Amanda

18. Unsure of when the last pot of coffee was made at your office? Avoid this by creating a handy coffee timekeeper.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Life.Hackaday

19. Create a chalkboard or whiteboard wall in your office using special paint. Now you’ll always have a place to jot stuff down.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Tim Owens; Flickr

20. Use a clear, hanging shoe rack to organize office supplies or any other important materials you’d like to find in one quick glance.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Free Stylin’

21. Never forget your passwords by using one of these handy apps.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Wikipedia Commons

22. Reduce stress and keep yourself focused by taking regular breaks. The FitBolt app acts as an easy reminder to get in a quick stretch or even a no-sweat exercise video.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

23. Avoid smudges and fingerprints on your screen by wrapping it with clear plastic wrap.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know
Beautifully Contained

24. Keep your desk drawers organized by reusing old cereal boxes.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

I Heart Organizing

25. Understand your daily habits and what’s holding you back from being more productive by downloading Rescue Time.

Image:25 Office Hacks You Need To Know

Do you have an life-saving office hack you’d like to share? Post in the comments below!

About Ilya Pozin:
Founder of 
Ciplex and Open Me. Columnist for Inc, Forbes & LinkedIn. Gadget lover, investor, mentor, husband, father, and '30 Under 30' entrepreneur. Follow Ilya below to stay up-to-date with his articles and updates!

Domain Services - Ripoff - Domain Services <domainserv435696@hotmail.com> - Fax only 1 212 913 9858

The ACE  13 October 2013 10:32:23 AM
Sent from - Domain Services <- Why sent from a hotmail account !!!

Deceptive Advertising Stating: Attention:

Important Notice - DOMAIN SERVICE NOTICE

Do not discard, this notice is not an invoice it is a courtesy reminder to register your domain name search engine listing so your customers can locate you on the web. NOTE: There is no company name offered, no address, no phone number only a fax number of 212-913-9858. The solicitation does not come from any bona-fide email address; rather it comes from a hotmail.com address. That in itself is a RED FLAG. You have no idea who you're dealing with upon receipt of this email, meaning it could simply be a way of farming email or other information. Offer and pricing means nothing as there is no company or contact info' mentioned.

"Failure to complete your Domain name search engine registration by the expiration date may result in cancellation of this offer making it difficult for your customers to locate you on the web."

I really like the do not include credit card details

"do not include your credit card details on this form, just fill the information above and fax it to us, once we receive your fax we will send you instructions on how to make a payment by credit card, also make sure you provide us with your contact phone number above)"

Apparently it was sent from jiffytext.com

My suggestion: Avoid like the plague.

SMTP Reply Codes

The ACE  19 August 2013 11:29:37 AM
See rfc2821 for the basic specification of SMTP; see also rfc1123 for important additional information.

See rfc1893 and rfc2034 for information about enhanced status codes.

Reply codes in numerical order

Code     Meaning
200 (nonstandard success response, see rfc876)
211 System status, or system help reply
214 Help message
220 Service ready
221 Service closing transmission channel
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
251 User not local; will forward to
354 Start mail input; end with .
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
450 Requested mail action not taken: mailbox unavailable
451 Requested action aborted: local error in processing
452 Requested action not taken: insufficient system storage
500 Syntax error, command unrecognized
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
502 Command not implemented
503 Bad sequence of commands
504 Command parameter not implemented
521 Domain does not accept mail (see rfc1846)
530 Access denied
535 SMTP Authentication unsuccessful/Bad username or assword
550 Requested action not taken: mailbox unavailable
551 User not local; please try
552 Requested mail action aborted: exceeded storage allocation
553 Requested action not taken: mailbox name not allowed
554 Transaction failed

Reply codes grouped by command

Command     Code     Description

CONNECT
220 Service ready
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
HELO
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
504 Command parameter not implemented
521 does not accept mail [rfc1846]
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
EHLO
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
550 Not implemented
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
504 Command parameter not implemented
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
MAIL
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
552 Requested mail action aborted: exceeded storage allocation
451 Requested action aborted: local error in processing
452 Requested action not taken: insufficient system storage
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
RCPT
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
251 User not local; will forward to
550 Requested action not taken: mailbox unavailable
551 User not local; please try
552 Requested mail action aborted: exceeded storage allocation
553 Requested action not taken: mailbox name not allowed
450 Requested mail action not taken: mailbox unavailable
451 Requested action aborted: local error in processing
452 Requested action not taken: insufficient system storage
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
503 Bad sequence of commands
521 does not accept mail [rfc1846]
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
DATA
354 Start mail input; end with .
451 Requested action aborted: local error in processing
554 Transaction failed
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
503 Bad sequence of commands
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
552 Requested mail action aborted: exceeded storage allocation
554 Transaction failed
451 Requested action aborted: local error in processing
452 Requested action not taken: insufficient system storage
RSET
200 (nonstandard success response, see rfc876)
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
504 Command parameter not implemented
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
SEND
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
552 Requested mail action aborted: exceeded storage allocation
451 Requested action aborted: local error in processing
452 Requested action not taken: insufficient system storage
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
502 Command not implemented
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
SOML
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
552 Requested mail action aborted: exceeded storage allocation
451 Requested action aborted: local error in processing
452 Requested action not taken: insufficient system storage
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
502 Command not implemented
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
SAML
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
552 Requested mail action aborted: exceeded storage allocation
451 Requested action aborted: local error in processing
452 Requested action not taken: insufficient system storage
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
502 Command not implemented
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
VRFY
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
251 User not local; will forward to
550 Requested action not taken: mailbox unavailable
551 User not local; please try
553 Requested action not taken: mailbox name not allowed
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
502 Command not implemented
504 Command parameter not implemented
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
EXPN
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
550 Requested action not taken: mailbox unavailable
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
502 Command not implemented
504 Command parameter not implemented
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
HELP
211 System status, or system help reply
214 Help message
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
501 Syntax error in parameters or arguments
502 Command not implemented
504 Command parameter not implemented
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
NOOP
200 (nonstandard success response, see rfc876)
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
421 Service not available, closing transmission channel
QUIT
221 Service closing transmission channel
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
TURN
250 Requested mail action okay, completed
502 Command not implemented
500 Syntax error, command unrecognised
503 Bad sequence of commands


Remotely Enabling RDP

The ACE  6 August 2013 03:31:08 PM
Have you ever tried to remotely access someone else's computer in your office, just to be shot down by a "can not connect" line? This is a quick tutorial on how to evade that little bugger, and enable remote access, remotely.

The problem

Cant get on to someone else's computer is usually the 2nd problem, the 1st was why they contacted you. The 2nd is noticing you have the problem with RDP not working.

Image:Remotely Enabling RDP


Open up Regedit

First real step is open up registry editor (start, run, regedit), and locate "Connect Network Registry..."

951982d3cd1da8eabbc8f101c18373e33a5a2bc98f91acf776c5e54051243b6b_untitled2_big

This is what will happen

Once that is opened, locate your offending PC, this is what it should look like when all is said and done.

2e5f0c7ab253098b03e64c9e44fabad85f4c48217de35820073d088ab7182046_untitled3_big


1 more search

Find HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ SYSTEM \ CurrentControlSet \ Control \ Terminal Server
And locate the Key fDenyTSConnections

Cfc1ce0719634e754146bf27f9667111058a32d03e368ffdfd30b0ce7b686bbe_untitled4_big
Change the value

Change the value from 1 to 0, now you can connect


BTW - You should not need to reboot the remote PC for this to take effect.

How to Get Me to Email You Back

The ACE  25 June 2013 03:54:36 PM
After using email for going on 20 years (I used to run a Bulleting Board running OS/2) and I noticed that I responded much more quickly to some emails than others—and the ones that elicited fast replies followed the same principles. Here’s what worked for them, and for me.

1. Perfect the subject line. When it comes to information, it’s hard not to judge a book by its cover. In To Sell Is Human, Dan Pink covers a study showing that people are more likely to read emails with subject lines to create curiosity or provide utility. When people aren’t busy, they’re drawn in by subject lines that intrigue them. But when they’re busy, curiosity fades in importance; the emails that get read are the ones with practical subject lines. When you want to grab the attention of someone important, scrap the entertaining subject lines and focus on utility. Here are some of the most effective subject lines that landed in my inbox from strangers:

  • Curiosity: “Advice for a fellow teleological people-person,” “I do not want anything from you,” “Your book kept me up all night,” “I will fly up and see you; you interest me,” and “Dan Pink would want me to write a creative subject line here”
  • Utility: “Applying your techniques to recovering addicts” and “Getting you to Atlanta”
  • Both: “Can you help give away 4 million dollars a year?” [Here, the sender cleverly went on to clarify, “I know the subject sounds like something you'd get from Nigeria, but…”]
2. Tell them why you chose them. On the receiving end, I was surprised by the number of readers who wrote asking for help without explaining why I was the right person to help them. One person reached out looking for advice on how to become a millionaire; another asked for help fighting a malpractice lawsuit. Neither of these requests is easily handled by a management professor. We know from research on social loafing that when people feel they have no unique contribution to make, they feel little responsibility to step up. Good emails overcome this barrier by highlighting what drew you to this person and the distinctive value that he or she can add. It’s worth devoting a sentence or two to what you know about the person’s work, and how it has influenced your life. Some of the best emails I received referenced particular studies that I had conducted and speeches I had given.

3. Show that you’ve done your homework. A sizeable number of readers wrote asking for links to articles that were freely available on my public website. As author Tim Ferriss, himself a cold-email virtuoso, writes, “It’s amazing how many would-be mentees or beneficiaries ask busier people for answers Google could provide in 20 seconds.” The psychologist Bernard Weiner has found that people are more motivated to help those who try to help themselves. When you reach out to someone busy, Ferriss advises, “Explicitly state what you’ve done to get answers or help yourself.”

4. Highlight uncommon commonalities. I felt a stronger connection to strangers who emphasized something unusual that we had in common. As the psychologist Robert Cialdini sums up the evidence from Influence, “Similarity literally draws people together.” In Give and Take, I elaborate on this principle to point out that similarities matter most when they’re rare. We bond when we share uncommon commonalities, which allow us to feel that we fit in and stand out at the same time. Think of the last time you traveled abroad and met someone from your hometown. If you met at home, the connection wouldn’t stand out as unique, but on foreign soil, you’re the only two people from there, so you feel a sense of closeness. When I cold-emailed Zappos.com CEO Tony Hsieh, my first instinct was to mention that we attended the same college. After realizing that thousands of people share that connection with him, I looked for uncommon commonalities. I ended up writing that I first learned about him when my college roommate followed in his footsteps to run the Quincy Grille. And even though I’m aware of this principle, I’m apparently not immune to it. When I received emails from a fellow springboard diver and a former magician—two relatively uncommon hobbies of mine—I couldn’t escape the feeling of affinity.

5. Make your request specific, and keep it short and sweet. A large number of emails were mini-novels, spanning multiple single-spaced pages. The longer the message, the longer it took me to read and respond, and the more overloaded my inbox, the less patient I was in reading them. As the psychologist Robert Sutton recaps the evidence in Good Boss, Bad Boss, people are more helpful when they’re given clear directions on how to contribute. When Tim Ferriss challenged Princeton students to reach out to celebrities and top executives, one got an answer from then-Google CEO Eric Schmidt simply by asking him about when in his life he was happiest. Schmidt responded: “Tomorrow.” Ferriss suggests that the best approach is to “send a two- to three-paragraph e-mail which explains that you are familiar with their work, and ask one simple-to-answer but thought-provoking question in that e-mail related to their work or life philosophies. The goal is to start a dialogue so they take the time to answer future e-mails—not to ask for help. That can only come after at least three or four genuine e-mail exchanges.”

6. Express gratitude. My least favorite emails made demands instead of expressing appreciation. One person wrote, “We should definitely meet,” and another implored, “Please answer this question.” In my research, I’ve found that people provide more extensive and useful help when it’s an enjoyable choice than when it’s driven by perceived pressure or obligation.

I was excited to help when I felt I could make a difference, not when someone was attempting to coerce me or create a sense of obligation. One of the least motivating strings of emails came from a reader who described a complicated family situation and demanded that I respond “promptly.” Within a week, I sent a three-paragraph reply. I explained that it would be difficult to help without knowing the people involved, but offered a suggestion, attached an article, and recommended a book. The reply from the person said, “I am in receipt of your email” without a single expression of gratitude, and extinguished my desire to be helpful.

Gratitude is more powerful than we realize. In one experiment, Francesca Gino and I asked people to spend some time helping a student improve a job application cover letter. After they sent their feedback, the student replied with a message, “I just wanted to let you know that I received your feedback on my cover letter,” and asked for help with another one in the next three days. Only 32% of the people helped. When the student added just eight words—“Thank you so much! I am really grateful”—the rate of helping doubled to 66%. In another experiment, after people helped one student, a different student asked them for help. Being thanked by the first student boosted helping rates from 25% to 55%. The punch line: a little thanks goes a long way, not only for encouraging busy people to help you, but also for motivating them to help others like you.


Gmail Hacks That Will Change The Way You Use Gmail

The ACE  22 June 2013 01:27:49 PM
your.name@gmail.com = y.o.u.r.n.a.m.e@gmail.com

Let’s say your email is your.name@gmail.com. That’s great, but the dots don’t matter. At all.

If someone emails you at y.o.u.r.n.a.m.e@gmail.com, it’ll work just fine.


Undo accidental emails.

8 Gmail Hacks That Will Change The Way You Use Email

Click that weirdly shaped icon in the top right corner of Gmail, then mouse down to “Settings.”

Then click to “Labs.” Search for the lab feature titled “Undo Send.” Enable it, and click “Save changes.”

Still in “Settings,” go to “General,” and scroll down to the “Undo Send” section. Enable it there too.


8 Gmail Hacks That Will Change The Way You Use Email

Every time you send an email, a yellow bar will pop up and give you the chance to click undo. So the next time you accidentally email the entire company something that was only supposed to go to one person, you’ve got a few seconds to fix your mistake.

Add plus signs to filter out unwanted email.

Add plus signs to filter out unwanted email.

Let’s say you’re signing up for a new gym membership, but you don’t want to give them your main email. So add a plus sign to it: your.name+GYM@gmail.com. (Anything you put after the “+” will work.)

When the first email from the gym shows up, click on it, then click “More,” then “Filter messages like these.” A pop-up will appear, and enter the plus sign address into the “To” line. Click “Create filter with this search.”

Then you get to choose what you want to do with those emails. Want them all to go directly to trash? Just check “Delete it,” and hit “Create filter” to save your setting. And you’ll never see an email from your gym again! They’ll automatically all go straight into the garbage.

Send & Archive mode cleans up your inbox

Send & Archive mode cleans up your inbox

Go back to “Settings,” then “General.” Scroll down to “Send and Archive,” and click the “Show” button.

When you reply to a message in your inbox, you’ll see the “Send & Archive” button appear. Unless you really reeeeeally need that message to hang around on the front page of your inbox, hit “Send & Archive.” Your inbox will be a little bit less cluttered, and you’ll still be able to find that message by searching for it in Gmail.

Insert images directly into an email.

Insert images directly into an email.

Go to “Settings,” then “Labs,” then search “Inserting Images.” Enable the feature.

Then, the next time you want to respond to a co-worker with a hilarious GIF — or, you know, something practical for your job — you can embed it right there in the email. Just drag the image into the email. Or click the “Insert images” icon when you’re in compose mode and add the URL for the image.

Figure out which senders are legit.

Figure out which senders are legit.

This is another excellent Gmail Labs hack. Go back to “Labs,” and search for “Authentication icon for verified senders.” Enable it.

The next time you get an email from a company like Ebay or PayPal, you’ll see a little key next to their sender name. That’s how you know the email’s legit and not an email from a spammer or identity thief.

Send canned responses for repetitive emails

Send canned responses for repetitive emails

So you hate sending the same email over and over again? Gmail’s got a trick for that. Again, go to “Labs,” then search for “Canned Responses” and enable it.

Now here’s the semi-tricky part. Go to “Compose” and write the canned email. Then, just below the “To” line, click “Canned Responses,” and go down to “Save.” Click “New Canned Response,” and give that email a title.

Then the next time you want to reply with that canned email, click “Canned Responses” and select the email response you want. Gmail will insert it at the top of your reply, and all you have to do is send it off.

Import other web tools to hack together whatever you want.

Import other web tools to hack together whatever you want.

Want to connect with your contacts on social media? Use Rapportive to see all of their social profiles within your inbox — no clicking required. (It shows up like that screenshot above.)

Running out of space in your Gmail account? Use Find Big Mail to figure out what big files are clogging up your email.

Want to schedule your emails for sending at a later time? (Sometimes, you don’t want your boss or professor to know you wrote an email at 3 a.m.) Use Boomerang to schedule that email for a more appropriate time.

Round Robin and why you need to use it

The ACE  21 June 2013 12:08:57 PM
What is DNS round robin load balancing

Round Robin is a 'simple' method that allows you network to be more resilient, if you think about MX (Mail Exchange) records they are created with a weighting, typically 10,20,30 ... 100, this allow the DNS servers to point to more than one SMTP server. Thus round round dns allows for more than one server eg. web HTTP server to respond to a client.

Round robin is a local balancing mechanism used by DNS servers to share and distribute network resource loads. You can use it to rotate all resource record (RR) types contained in a query answer if multiple RRs are found.


Configuring round robin

Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

Configuring round robin

By default, DNS uses round robin to rotate the order of RR data returned in query answers where multiple RRs of the same type exist for a queried DNS domain name. This feature provides a simple method for load balancing client use of Web servers and other frequently queried multihomed computers.

If round robin is disabled for a DNS server, the order of the response for these queries is based on a static ordering of RRs in the answer list as they are stored in the zone (either its zone file or Active Directory).

Example: Round-robin rotation

A forward lookup-type query (for all A RRs that match a DNS domain name) is made for a multihomed computer (multihomed.example.microsoft.com) that has three IP addresses. Separate A RRs are used to map the host's name to each of these IP addresses in the zone. In the stored example.microsoft.com zone, the RRs appear in this fixed order:

multihomed   IN  A  10.0.0.1

multihomed   IN  A  10.0.0.2

multihomed   IN  A  10.0.0.3

The first DNS client that queries the server to resolve this host's name receives the list in default order. When a second client sends a subsequent query to resolve this name, the list is rotated as follows:

multihomed   IN  A  10.0.0.2

multihomed   IN  A  10.0.0.3

multihomed   IN  A  10.0.0.1

Restricting round-robin rotation for selected RR types

By default, DNS will perform round-robin rotation for all RR types. You can specify that certain RR types are not to be round-robin rotated in the registry. There is a registry entry called DoNotRoundRobinTypes (REG_SZ) with a string value containing a list of RR types. By modifying this entry, you turn off round-robin rotation for specific RR types. For example, to prevent round-robin rotation for A, PTR, SRV, and NS record types, you would enter the following value for the registry entry:

a ptr srv ns

Restricting round-robin rotation for all RR types

The default setting for round-robin rotation is contained in the registry entry RoundRobin (REG_DWORD). By default, this entry's value is 1, rotating all RR types except those listed in the DoNotRoundRobinTypes registry entry. If the value of RoundRobin is set to 0, then no RR types will be round-robin rotated.

Caution

  • Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer. You can also use the Last Known Good Configuration startup option if you encounter problems after manual changes have been applied.
Notes
  • The string value for the DoNotRoundRobinTypes registry entry may contain types in numeric (as shown above) of mnemonic formats.
  • Both of the round robin registry entries must be created and stored in the following registry subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\DNS\Parameters
  • Local subnet priority supersedes the use of round-robin rotation for multihomed names. When enabled, round-robin continues to be a secondary method used to sort multiple RRs returned in a listed answer. For more information on local subnet priority, see Prioritizing local subnets.

Draytek routers CLI - srv nat openport - enable an index

The ACE  15 June 2013 02:52:11 PM
We have a customer who has Draytek routers and asked us to automate the security policy we created for them. There are a number of documents that are on the net that 'detail' how to use the Draytek Routers CLI - http://www.scribd.com/doc/72948845/DrayTek-Telnet-Commands-V1-11

http://whirlpool.net.au/wiki/telnet_guide_01

Non of these are correct, for example to enable a disabled Open Port in NAT they are saying the command is -> srv nat openport enable 17

But the usage ( Help ) of the srv nat openport of the router itself says - srv nat openport n m [- | ... ]

Thus the correct command apears to be -> srv nat openport 17 -a 1

The actual commands need to have a sub-index ( m ) of 1, who knows why ( Anyone ) ???

To enable index 17  -> srv nat openport 17 1 -a 1

To disable index 17 -> srv nat openport 17 1 -a 0

Chinese monkeys - 219.141.189.227

The ACE  11 October 2012 09:07:52 PM
More pathetic Chinese monkeys, they are embarrassing hackers worldwide, but,  if you are paying peanuts or maybe that is rice you have to expect you will end up with monkeys.

IP Address:                     219.141.189.227
IP Address Country:          China (CN)
IP Address Region:         22 Beijing
IP Address City:         Beijing
IP Address Latitude:         39.9289016724
IP Address Longitude:         116.388298035
IP Address ISP:          Data Communication Division
IP Address Host:         bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net

They were opening and closing the ports 316 times, until the router locked them out.

Server 1

11/10/2012 08:51:55 PM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 219.141.189.227,35132 to x.x.x.x,25
11/10/2012 08:51:55 PM  dbMon 3: SMTP Connect - Session ID : '112' - Remote IP : '219.141.189.227' - Host : 'bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net'
11/10/2012 08:51:55 PM  dbMon 3: SMTP Document Updated - IP '219.141.189.227' - Host 'bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net'
11/10/2012 08:51:56 PM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 219.141.189.227,35132 to x.x.x.x,25

11/10/2012 08:53:36 PM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 219.141.189.227,43265 to x.x.x.x,25
11/10/2012 08:53:36 PM  dbMon 3: SMTP Connect - Session ID : '269' - Remote IP : '219.141.189.227' - Host : 'bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net'
11/10/2012 08:53:36 PM  dbMon 3: SMTP Document Updated - IP '219.141.189.227' - Host 'bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net'
11/10/2012 08:53:36 PM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 219.141.189.227,43265 to x.x.x.x,25


Server 2

11/10/2012 08:50:20 PM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 219.141.189.227,42676 to x.x.x.x,25
11/10/2012 08:50:20 PM  dbMon 3: SMTP Connect - Session ID : '175' - Remote IP : '219.141.189.227' - Host : 'bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net'
11/10/2012 08:50:20 PM  dbMon 3: New SMTP - IP '219.141.189.227' - Host 'bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net' (USA TLD)
11/10/2012 08:50:20 PM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 219.141.189.227,42676 to x.x.x.x,25

11/10/2012 08:51:55 PM  Opened TCP/IP connection from 219.141.189.227,50420 to x.x.x.x,25
11/10/2012 08:51:55 PM  dbMon 3: SMTP Connect - Session ID : '332' - Remote IP : '219.141.189.227' - Host : 'bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net'
11/10/2012 08:51:55 PM  dbMon 3: SMTP Document Updated - IP '219.141.189.227' - Host 'bj141-189-227.bjtelecom.net'
11/10/2012 08:51:55 PM  Closed TCP/IP connection from 219.141.189.227,50420 to x.x.x.x,25


We are so lucky that our servers did not crash under the strain of this onslaught NOT :)

PowerShell to store user credentials encrypted for re-use

The ACE  26 July 2012 01:12:38 AM

PowerShell code to store user credentials encrypted for re-use

There may be times, when writing a PowerShell script, that you want to securely store a password for re-use. I have found this useful when connecting to Exchange or Active directory services so you don?t have to plague the administrators with repeated login prompts. Taking security into mind, there is a small decision you must make on whether you want to store your active directory password as an encrypted string on your hard drive as normal secure strings are only stored in memory.

I will step through the code below, giving you a more detailed explanation on each section.

#STORED CREDENTIAL CODE
$AdminName = Read-Host "Enter your Admin AD username"
$CredsFile = "C:\$AdminName-PowershellCreds.txt"
$FileExists = Test-Path $CredsFile
if  ($FileExists -eq $false) {
    Write-Host 'Credential file not found. Enter your password:' -ForegroundColor Red
    Read-Host -AsSecureString | ConvertFrom-SecureString | Out-File $CredsFile
    $password = get-content $CredsFile | convertto-securestring
    $Cred = new-object -typename System.Management.Automation.PSCredential -argumentlist domain\$AdminName,$password}
else
    {Write-Host 'Using your stored credential file' -ForegroundColor Green
    $password = get-content $CredsFile | convertto-securestring
    $Cred = new-object -typename System.Management.Automation.PSCredential -argumentlist domain\$AdminName,$password}
sleep 2
Write-Host 'Connecting to Active Directory'
#Establishes connection to Active Directory and Exchange with the specified user acccount and password.
Connect-QADService -Service 'server' -Credential $Cred -ErrorAction Stop | out-Null
$Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri http://server.fqdn.com/PowerShell/ -Credential $Cred -Authentication Kerberos -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Import-PSSession $Session -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue -AllowClobber
if(!$?)
    {write-host "Failed importing the exchange pssession, exiting!"
    exit}
#END OF STORED CREDENTIAL CODE

Explanation of the code

$AdminName = Read-Host "Enter your Admin AD username"
$CredsFile = "C:\$AdminName-PowershellCreds.txt"
$FileExists = Test-Path $CredsFile

This snippet is not doing anything surprising, it?s asking for the Administrator?s username, specifying the location of the future credential file, and checking to see if the credential file exists with test-path. Asking for the Administrator?s username is required as the username is what ?unlocks? the encrypted string.

if  ($FileExists -eq $false) {
Write-Host 'Credential file not found. Enter your password:'
Read-Host -AsSecureString | ConvertFrom-SecureString | Out-File $CredsFile

This section is where the code starts to work for you. If running this for the first time, the credential file does not yet exist so you will be prompted with a typical username password box to enter your active directory credentials. PowerShell takes the username and password you have entered (as a secure string), converts it to an encrypted string and then lastly outputs it to a file. The password will look similar to this one, just lots longer: 01000000d08c9ddf0115d1118c7a0

$password = get-content $CredsFile | convertto-securestring
$Cred = new-object -typename System.Management.Automation.PSCredential -argumentlist domain\$AdminName,$password}

This section is actually used twice, once if the file is not found and once if the file exists. The code assembles the PSCredential object to be used later on. You notice that the $Password variable takes the encrypted contents of our credential file we created above and converts it back to a secure string to be used for the new object called $Cred.

else
{Write-Host 'Using your stored credential file' -ForegroundColor Green
$password = get-content $CredsFile | convertto-securestring
$Cred = new-object -typename System.Management.Automation.PSCredential -argumentlist domain\$AdminName,$password}

This is the other half of the IF statement from above simply stating that if the file exists we will use the stored credential file and assemble our PSCredential object exactly as the previous snippet.

Connect-QADService -Service 'gbay-ad01' -Credential $Cred
$Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri http://server.fqdn.com/PowerShell/ -Credential $Cred -Authentication Kerberos

You can then use the $Cred variable to connect to various services such as Active Directory and Microsoft Exchange as shown above. The administrator will only be prompted for his username as required to ?unlock? the encrypted form of the password.

 

Choosing a Domain Name Business Name

The ACE  19 July 2012 01:03:40 PM
Tips When Choosing A Domain Name and Business Name

Starting a can be daunting and difficult. You want to make certain you get it right the first time every time so you can not only live comfortably, but scale up your business and see your investment in time and money grow.

Choosing a domain name might seem like a minor thing, but it is an extremely important part of establishing your business, I always tell people to call the business name the same as the domain eg. if the domain is xyz.com.au, then the business should be called xyz.

Here are a few tips to help you choose the right domain name for our company.

The domain should be easy to Say

Imagine a hypothetical domain of http://premium-dog-house-builders.com/; you can not just say 'premium dog house builders dot com', because then your customer will go to http://premiumdoghousebuilders.com/, which is a completely different address. You would have to say 'hyphen' in between each word, which does not sound very good.

Additionally, your name should flow easily when spoken aloud. If it does not sound good or is difficult to say, ditch it.

Easy to Understand Over the Radio or Phone

This is similar to the first tip. You have to take into account how the name sounds as you say it, and there has to be no room for misunderstanding your name when it?s heard.

Easy to Spell

If you are telling someone your domain name, you do not want to choose words that they will have difficulty spelling. Stick to words that are commonly used, short and easy to understand. This will also help you achieve the first two tips.

Additionally, you will also want to be sure you have spelled your address correctly when you register it. Spelling mistakes will hurt your image and make it more difficult to find your website. If had a client who ignored my advise and went ahead and registered Capitel for a phone business in the nations federal capitel, but the name on the site was 'Capital Telephones', a few months later he go me to registered the correctly spelt domain, what a waste of time of money !!!

Easy to Type

Avoid mixing in numbers, hyphens or anything odd that will cause your user to have to look around the keyboard. Do not make your customer frustrated before they have even gotten to the website. An exception to this rule is registering a "post Code" domain - www.5453.com.au - this is very easy to remember for a user.

Easy to Read in Print and Online Ads

Your reader should not be struggling to make sense of your domain. Your business only needs one domain per region, so don?t go overboard and try to register all the possible domains you can. Choose one and stick with it, unless you?re planning on offering your services to more than one location (such as US vs. UK).

Easy to Read in the Address Bar

You need to stick to top-level domains such as .com, .com.au, .net, .net.au and .org.au. The best choice will always be .com or .com.au, since these is the most common domain you will find, and the first one users try if they can not remember what it should be. We have broken this rule myself with my consulting business and we have registered and are using TrustedAdvisor.IT - obviously as we are a IT consulting company it was appropriate, plus we could not find any 'TrustedAdvisor' .com, .com.au etc.

Easy to Remember

If you follow the other rules, this one will be a snap. Stick to top level domains that are easy to say and read. Otherwise you will see that your customers have trouble finding your website.

An interesting side bar, ASIC - the federal government organisation who is responsible for registration of company names Australia wide, is now responsible for Business Names as well, this was up until May 2012 undertaken by the states individually, so if you want to have a business name Australia wide per May 2012, you had to registered in each state and territory (crazy stuff), so we would suggest you register the Business Name at the same time you registe r the domain name.

How does your domain stack up against this criteria ?

Your Domain Name, Sub-Domain Name, Web Page File Names, and Page Titles

The ACE  15 July 2012 03:33:35 PM

The words in your your domain name, sub-domain name, web page titles, and web page (html) file names can definitely affect a web page's search engine ranking.The sub-domain name, title and web page name are the easiest items you can change. Changing the domain name is not something you want to consider changing unless your have a very compelling business reason.

Let us say someone goes to Google and begins a search for "postcode 5453" If your website's domain name is "www.5453.com.au" and on that site you have a page titled "postcode 5453" that's been saved with a file name "postcode5453.htm," then you have a very good chance of one day appearing at the top of a search for "postcode 5453".

Sub-Domain names is a facility that web developer do not seem to understand very well or have just forgotten about, they are a DNS technique I have used to very good effect to bolster SEO results. They help a user "dive" into a web site easily when they get to know the sites layout, for example I always have a blog sub-domain eg. http://blog.5453.com.au will take you to the blog for the 5453.com.au site.

All search engines order its results a differently, try a search with google and bing and the results can be very surprising, some search engines seem to weight the words in your domain name, sub-domain name, web page titles, and web page file names more heavily. Plus google returns the results depending on your previous searchs. So now it is starting to get very complicated.

For instance, if you run a search for "guitar tuner," the site that comes up at the top of Google's search results is an online guitar tuner on one of the pages of www.gieson.com. The actual address of the page that has the online guitar tuner on it is http://www.gieson.com/Library/projects/utilities/tuner/index.html .

Now, if you run the same search (for "guitar tuner") on Yahoo, the top (unpaid) result is www.howtotuneaguitar.org. My guess here (remember how mysterious the workings of search engines are) is that Yahoo gives more weight to how well the words in a domain name match the search terms. In other words, the search was for "guitar tuner," and since both "guitar" and "tune" are in the domain name of www.howtotuneaguitar.org, Yahoo gives it the nod over the guitar tuner at www.gieson.com/Library/projects/utilities/tuner/index.html .

However, if you do the same search at Google, the top two results are flip-flopped--the tuner at gieson.com is now first and the tuner at howtotuneaguitat.org is second. You might conclude, therefore, that Yahoo weighs how well a search phrase matches a domain name more heavily than Google does.

And a quick comparison between these two sites on Alexa.com also reveals that the guitar tuner at gieson.com has 488 pages linking in to it while he tuner at howtotuneaguitar.org has just 97 sites linking in to it.

Could it be that Google weighs "link-ins" heavier than domain names--or at least that it weighs links-ins more heavily than Yahoo does?

Either way, on any search that you conduct, take notice of the search terms that are highlighted within the search results. Search engines definitely pay attentio n to the words in a domain name, sub-domain name, page titles, and html file names.

If you can't change your domain name to match your topic, th at's not a big deal, your sub-domain, page titles and html file names are totally in your control, and three out of four is not too bad !


lightandlifephotos.com, 173.203.115.220

The ACE  29 June 2012 06:43:51 PM
29/06/2012 05:09:14 AM  SMTP Server: www.lightandlifephotos.com (173.203.115.220) connected
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Iranian Monkeys 46.36.115.17

The ACE  26 June 2012 07:27:18 PM
These guys are pathetic, I guess just more of the same, if you are paying peanuts you have to expect you will end up with monkeys.

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24/06/2012 08:21:17 AM  SMTP Server: 46.36.115.17 connected
24/06/2012 08:21:18 AM  SMTP Server: 46.36.115.17 disconnected. 0 message[s] received
24/06/2012 08:21:19 AM  SMTP Server: 46.36.115.17 disconnected. 0 message[s] received

It is just so lucky that our servers did not crash under the strain of this onslaught NOT :)

Keith.Armstrong@caseddimensions.com - Spammer

The ACE  13 June 2012 10:06:59 AM

I have setup a honey pot at Linkedin and I have a spammer take the bate - "Keith Armstrong" Keith.Armstrong@caseddimensions.com

I amazes me how desperate these guys are to send your their pathetic spam mail.    
 
12/06/2012 9:43:15 PM - TCPIP - 89.31.237.77
12/06/2012 9:43:16 PM - ehlo no.ptr.hostlogic.biz
12/06/2012 9:43:16 PM - mail from:<keith.armstrong@caseddimensions.com>
12/06/2012 9:43:17 PM - rcpt to:me@domain.com
12/06/2012 9:43:17 PM - data
12/06/2012 9:43:18 PM - quit

If you want to see a picture of the spammer here he is -> Linkedin Profile Keith Armstrong


528 SMTP connect/disconnect - 122.183.204.37 - Indian Monkeys

The ACE  24 May 2012 12:37:01 PM

More indian monkey hackers, they must be working for peanuts, they connected then immediately disconnected 528 times, gee these guys are so boring :)

IP Address Country: India (IN)
IP Address Region: 25 Tamil Nadu
IP Address City: Madras

IP Address Latitude: 13.0832996368
IP Address Longitude: 80.2833023071

IP Address ISP: Bharti Broadband

IP Address Host: telemedia-smb-037.204.183.122.airtelbroadband.in

23/05/2012 07:35:06 PM SMTP Server: telemedia-smb-037.204.183.122.airtelbroadband.in (122.183.204.37) connected
23/05/2012 07:35:06 PM SMTP Server: telemedia-smb-037.204.183.122.airtelbroadband.in (122.183.204.37) disconnected. 0 message[s] received


Why backup email ?

The ACE  18 May 2012 10:49:15 AM

 In my last post, I mentioned I would be exploring ways of streamline mail handling. Firstly I will consider why we keep e-mail in the first place ?

When I was a Software Engineer - developing code in the past, at the end of the day before I went home for the day, I would open a new gmail email, paste in the script or what ever it was I had been working on during that day and email to my work email account.  This way I have a copy in the sent folder of gmail as a backup. Why did I do this, I wanted to use email as a repository for information I did not want to lose or because I thought I might need it in the future and wanted to be able to retrieve it easily.

Notice the "might".

Since most employers allows a relatively small amount of e-mail to be stored on the mail server, most people keep it in what is called a ".pst" (Outlook) or ".nsf" file (Lotus Notes) on their PC.  Most people know they should make a copy of the important information on their PC every now and then because the PC might crash, and they would lose their data.
 
When it comes to backing up the PC where they receive their e-mail, people tend to fall into one of three camps.

The first of these are the "happily ignorant" - they have a vague notion they should make safe copies of some things, but never seem to get around to it "and why should they" ... nothing bad has ever happened to them. 

The second are the "galloping paranoiac" - these people are obsessive about backing up their PCs, usually own writeable DVD drives and carry several large memory sticks.  They have been the prior victims of catastrophic hard disk failure and perhaps lost years of work or correspondence and are bound and determined it will not happen again. 

The third category lies somewhere in between the other two and might back up their volatile data somewhere between once a week and once a month, depending on when it occurs to them. 
 
Nearly all PCs come with writeable CD-ROM drives even though USB memory sticks are now so inexpensive that the need for optical disks like CDs and DVDs has almost vanished.  These devices should be used for the purpose of making off-line backup copies of important information to use for personal disaster recovery.  Backups are intended to be kept for a short time frame (months) until they have been superseded by other backups, and then either recycled or destroyed.  This is very different from making an archive of information.  The purpose of making an archive is to retain information for legal or regulatory reasons, such as tax or other financial records.
 
I am going to suggest to you that most employees have little need to perform backup operations and that when they do, the data they have to backup should take no more than a couple minutes to transfer and fit comfortably on an inexpensive USB memory stick.

In the next post I will discuss how and why you need to manage the information that is contained in your emails.


255 SMTP connect/disconnect - 59.55.142.9 - Chinese Monkeys

The ACE  8 May 2012 02:18:17 PM

More chinese monkey hackers, they must be working for peanuts, they connected then immediately disconnected 255 times, gee these guys are so boring :)

IP Address: 59.55.142.9
IP Address Country:   China (CN)
IP Address Region: 03 Jiangxi
IP Address City: Nanchang

IP Address Latitude: 28.5499992371
IP Address Longitude: 115.933296204

IP Address ISP:  CHINANET Jiangxi province network
Organisation:  CHINANET Jiangxi province network

IP Address Host: 59.55.142.9 - No reverse DNS entry (Blank hostname)

08/05/2012 9:10:58 AM - TCPIP - 59.55.142.9
08/05/2012 9:10:58 AM - Disconnect of session

08/05/2012 9:17:26 AM - TCPIP - 59.55.142.9
08/05/2012 9:17:26 AM - Disconnect of session


Google Defeats Microsoft in Epic Battle for Government Contract

The ACE  4 May 2012 03:26:01 PM
Again Google has beaten Microsoft (M$) for a contract with the USA Department of the Interior, they originally chose Microsoft Exchange and Sharepoint to provide e-mail and collaboration software for over 90,000 staff.

Google has been beating Microsoft as of late and is on a roll. Colorado state picked Google Apps over Microsoft Office 365 earlier this year. The BBVA Bank and Roche Group also contracted with Google for e-mail and collaboration, totalling about 200,000 paid seats. Now the Department of the Interior will pay Google $34.9 million over seven years, or $14 million less than the agency would have paid Microsoft, its incumbent vendor,

A Google spokesperson told CIO Journal: “We’re honored that the Department of the Interior has selected Google Apps for Government, and we look forward to working closely with the DOI to give employees new communication tools.” Microsoft told ZDNet it was disappointed in the decision.

Back in 2010, the Interior Department selected Microsoft’s collaboration software for governments. But Google and reseller partner Onix Networking sued to block the deal, claiming the government agency didn’t fairly consider Google Apps before offering Microsoft a five-year contract worth $49.3 million. Google withdrew its lawsuit in September 2011 after the Interior Department relinquished its rights to the Microsoft contract, claiming the research it used in picking Microsoft was “stale.”

A government announcement on Tuesday said the Interior Department shifted course, giving the contract to Google in an effort to cut costs by consolidating e-mail from seven different systems into Gmail. The agency also will use Google’s word processing software.

Google’s Apps business has seen some executive turnover, most notably the departure last month of long-time leader Dave Girouard. However, the company remains focused on the enterprise. Last week, Google launched Drive, its online storage service for businesses and consumers.

84 SMTP connect/disconnect - 74.165.0.251

The ACE  3 May 2012 12:58:49 PM
These guys should be embarassed to call themselves hackers. The connect and then disconnect to one of our SMTP (Email) servers 84 times in under 5 minutes. Well the server "almost" crashed under the strain - NOT, the logs say that the CPU usage was almost 10%, these guys are monkeys :)

TCPIP: 74.165.0.251 - Hostname: adsl-074-165-000-251.sip.asm.bellsouth.net  - Country: USA TLD  - Session Count: 84

03/05/2012 11:47:54 AM - TCPIP - 74.165.0.251
03/05/2012 11:47:58 AM - ehlo server

03/05/2012 11:47:13 AM - TCPIP - 74.165.0.251
03/05/2012 11:47:14 AM - ehlo server
03/05/2012 11:47:16 AM - auth login

03/05/2012 11:44:55 AM - TCPIP - 74.165.0.251
03/05/2012 11:44:56 AM - ehlo server
03/05/2012 11:44:57 AM - auth login

03/05/2012 11:48:01 AM - TCPIP - 74.165.0.251
03/05/2012 11:48:02 AM - ehlo server
03/05/2012 11:48:04 AM - auth login

As soon as our SMTP server had closed all the connections, a connection with an immediate disconnect was made from TCP IP Address - 200.124.228.52 - bioanuncios11.com

03/05/2012 11:56:08 AM  SMTP Server: bioanuncios11.com (200.124.228.52) connected
03/05/2012 11:56:09 AM  SMTP Server: bioanuncios11.com (200.124.228.52) disconnected. 0 message[s] received

I wonder if they were shocked that their pathetic attempts to crash the server were unsuccessful, after all these Monkeys are just so "powerful" aren't they.

Then almost exactly 1 hour later someone connected and disconnected again, I guess they were just checking if they had crashed the server again.

03/05/2012 12:58:00 PM  SMTP Server: arvx82.apwigmake.net (174.132.161.82) connected
03/05/2012 12:58:00 PM  SMTP Server: arvx82.apwigmake.net (174.132.161.82) disconnected. 0 message[s] received


What is a Yottabyte ?

The ACE  1 May 2012 09:16:46 AM

Well we have a modest "Data Centre (DC)" for our email, web and office servers, but it is nothing compare to the National Security Agency (NSA) new DC in Utah - http://rt.com/news/utah-data-center-spy-789/

It is a massive 1.5 million square feet facility and it is going to store yottabytes of data from email, phone and video "contacts".

So what is a yottabyte you may ask, there is a thousand gigabytes in a terabyte, there is a thousand terabytes in a petabyte, there is a thousand petabytes in an exabyte, there is a thousand exabytes in a zettabyte, and there is a thousand zettabytes in a yottabyte. So a yottabyte is 1,000,000,000,000,000GB. When you consider that a GB is a 1,000,000 bytes a yottabyte is a really big number :)